Art Journal Every Day: Ten Art Journaling Ideas
Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art: Part Two

Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art: Part One

I recently spent a weekend in Hartford, CT and therefore had the opportunity to visit the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art.  I wandered the museum by myself for a few hours and then took one of the docent-led "highlights" tours.  Most museums have free highlights tours and I encourage you to take advantage of them!  They're almost always led by deeply knowledgable docents who do a great job of answering questions and sharing insights and tips about important pieces from the museum's collection.  So, without any further ado, here's the first half of my visit to the Wadsworth Atheneum:

From the Balzer Designs Blog: Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art: Part One
From the Balzer Designs Blog: Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art: Part One
From the Balzer Designs Blog: Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art: Part One From the Balzer Designs Blog: Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art: Part One
From the Balzer Designs Blog: Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art: Part One
From the Balzer Designs Blog: Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art: Part One From the Balzer Designs Blog: Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art: Part One
From the Balzer Designs Blog: Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art: Part One
There are several things I usually share with you in my museum posts that I think are of note:

  • Wall Placards: When I remember, I try to always snap a photo of the wall placard next to the work of art.  I think this is important for a few reasons:
    • It helps me to become familiar with artists' names.  I often can remember the work, but not who did it.  When I take the photo with the artist's name, it gives me something to refer back to.
    • It's oddly difficult to stand still in a museum and read the placards.  I snap photos so that I can refer back later and learn something.
  • Detail Photos: If you're interested in learning from art, it's more than the overall composition.  The detail photos give me insights into how the artist might have constructed his/her work.
  • Photos for Scale: These are photos that include people, objects, frames, etc. to give you a sense of scale.  Art is often startlingly different in person than in pictures.  That difference is often scale.

I hope you enjoyed this art tour.  I will have more photos from the Hartford Atheneum tomorrow!

Thanks for stopping by!

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